How you can express your concerns about the
new Ohio 12th grade Draft Competencies

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THIS INFORMATION IS OUTDATED.  IT'S FROM the year 2000, AND IS KEPT ON OUR WEB SITE FOR HISTORICAL PURPOSES ONLY.  FOR THE MOST UP-TO-DATE  INFORMATION CONCERNING OHIO EDUCATION, SEE Updates on the 2002 proposed Ohio Science Academic Content Standards.

The Revised 12th Grade Proficiency Tests "Draft Competencies" can be viewed at the following web site:

http://www.state.oh.us/proficiency/draftcompsci.htm

We are currently in the process of reviewing these standards with the assistance of Creation Research, Science Education Foundation (CRSEF) - (in Columbus, OH) and Answers in Genesis Ministries Group. So far, we have found one area of concern. It is this excerpt from the proposed new competencies:

13. Describe changes in populations based on the development of species over time from simple to complex organisms and based on natural selection, natural variation, relationships between species and environmental conditions.

There are at least two major problems with this. First, macro evolution has never been observed by scientists. Second, it's mathematically impossible for biological evolution to have occurred. Therefore, this statement is a blind-faith belief that it outside of science, and should not be in the standards or competencies for 12th grade testing. However, that doesn't necessarily mean that we are going to end up suggesting that evolution be completely removed from the science curriculum at this time. We are making a distinction between what is available for students to learn (curriculum) and what they are required to learn (what they may actually be tested on - standards and competencies). The solution to dealing with the evolution/creation debate in a manner that is fair to all, may involve some balance between what is available and what is required learning.

Perhaps the best way to expose evolution for the hoax that it is would be to fully explain it, flaws and all. We don't believe the theory of evolution could survive as a scientific theory if the censoring of opposing scientific views were eliminated from the public school system and liberal media. We are not yet ready to say that allowing it to continue to be taught in some form is the best solution. But for now, we're leaning in this direction. For more information about some of the major scientific arguments against this proposed new competency, see these links:

Microevolution does not prove Macroevolution
The Mathematical improbabilities of evolution occurring
Life can't arise on its own from dead chemicals

We also think it's also important that parents become much more aware of the heavy influence that atheists, agnostics and humanists have on public school science curriculums, and how they are using evolution to promote the religions of atheism and humanism in the public schools. Consider the story of Dr. Gary Parker as a good example of this, or this quote from a leading evolutionist:

"I think a case can be made that faith is one of the world’s great evils, comparable to the smallpox virus but harder to eradicate. Faith, being belief that isn't based on evidence, is the principle vice of any religion.(1)

Consider this page on our web site to be a living document. It may change frequently during the next several weeks as we work with other organizations to sort through many of the thorny questions surrounding this issue.

The deadline for public comments on these proposed competencies is February 29, 2000. We encourage you to e-mail, fax or mail your concerns to them about these changes. As we study them in more depth, we'll post new information to this web page about what wording we're concerned with, along with why we're concerned and our opposing view. If you have similar concerns about these new standards as we do, and you'll e-mail your comments to the state board of education, please feel free to e-mail us a copy of your comments, or leave us a voice mail. We'll try to post as many of these e-mails and recordings of voice mails on our web site as we can. That way others will be able to see that they're not alone with the concerns that they have. To send us your comments, see our how to contact us page.

To share your comments with the state school board about these standards, link to the following web site and follow the instructions given there:

http://www.state.oh.us/proficiency/proposedcomp.htm

Footnotes:

1. Dawkins, Richard, "Is Science a Religion?" The Humanist, vol. 57 (January/February 1997), page 26

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